FAQ

 

FAQ

What specifications does Corfin process comply with?
I have a trim and form specification; what do I need to do?
I don’t have a trim and form specification; what do I need to do?
Why should devices be hot solder dipped after lead preparation?
What are the benefits and advantages of hot solder dipping versus plating?
My parts are ESD sensitive. How does Corfin ensure that my parts are protected?
Can Corfin process small lots?
What package types can Corfin process?
Can Corfin provide devices with a Lead Free finish?
How does Corfin ensure that parts meet the customer’s satisfaction?
After parts are processed, how are the parts shipped back to the customer?
What kind of tooling does Corfin use to trim, form, and hot solder dip components?
How do I get a quotation?

What specifications does Corfin process comply with?

Please see the list of standards – including the TMTI process – here.

<<back

I have a trim and form specification; what do I need to do?

If you already have a trim and form specification for your device, complete a Customer Requirements Form and send your trim and form specification with sample parts to Corfin. Corfin will evaluate your samples and return them along with a quotation.

<<back

I don’t have a trim and form specification; what do I need to do?

If you don’t have a lead preparation specification, provide Corfin with the mechanical package outline and your PCB pad layout, if it exists. Corfin will generate a trim and form specification and submit it for your approval. Once approved, Corfin will generate a quotation.

<<back

Why should devices be hot solder dipped after lead preparation?

During the trim and form process, the leads of the device are clamped and trimmed, resulting in exposed base material. This results in potential assembly and solderability problems if the component leads are not hot solder dipped. Corfin performs hot solder dip on all devices after trim and form. This eliminates potential assembly problems such as poor solderability, dewetting, nonwetting, and oxidation. Corfin hot solder dips devices using solders such as Sn63Pb37 or SAC305 which are compatible with the solder paste used in the PCB assembly process. This provides for better overall solder joint strength.

<<back

What are the benefits and advantages of hot solder dipping versus plating?

The hot solder dipping process has the following benefits:

  • The solder finish is more dense than plating and has at least two years storage shelf life.
  • The thicker solder coverage results in a greater volume of solder which improves toe and heel fillet in the solder joint and prevents insufficient solder joints.
  • The process dissolves any existing gold lead finish.
  • It does not negatively affect the Nickel barrier layer.
  • The specified solder alloy is compatible with the solder paste used in PCB assembly processes and ensures a homogeneous, reliable solder joint.
  • Eliminates gold embrittlement problems which may occur after PCB assembly.

Plating of terminations is an chemical process. The finish thickness is typically 50-100 microinches, less than half that of a hot solder finish and commercial components usually have much less than the minimum required thickness of military standards. Plated leads have a short life before oxidation of the lead finish starts (typically 30 days) due to porosity.

<<back

My parts are ESD-sensitive. How does Corfin ensure that my parts are protected?

Corfin maintains an ESD program to JESD-625. Our production areas have ESD dissipative tiles connected to ground. Each production area has separate temperature and humidity monitors and controls. All personnel wear ESD smocks, heel straps, continuously-monitored wrist straps, and finger cots. All paperwork is kept in static-safe travelers unless removed at least 12 inches from unprotected devices. Corfin has been certified by Military, Space, and Commercial companies to be < 50 volts ESD potential at the work surface.

<<back

Can Corfin process small lots?

Corfin processes lot sizes from small, prototype volumes to high, on-going production volumes: Corfin presently is processing over 5,000 different package styles. Typically, for any lot size greater than 100 units, there is no set-up charge.

<<back

What package types can Corfin process?

Corfin processes thousands of different package styles, including Flat packs, QFPs, SOICs, SSOPs, TSSOPs, TSOPs, QSOPs LCCs, PGAs, ASICs, RF Power Transistors, GaAs MMICs, Fiber Optics, Lasers, SAW Filters, Chip Components, BGA’s and J-Lead Components.

<<back

Can Corfin provide devices with a Lead-Free finish?

Corfin can flush off existing termination finishes and replace with SAC305 or other desired alloy:

  • The customer specifies the alloy required.
  • The customer can provide the alloy or Corfin can procure the alloy.
  • Corfin has the capability of using any alloy you require.

<<back

How does Corfin ensure that parts meet the customer’s satisfaction?

Corfin generates a Customer Process Authorization (CPA) sheet for each process. The CPA specifies the Customer’s exact process, handling, and packaging requirements. The CPA is reviewed and approved by Corfin’s Quality Assurance Manager and the Customer. It then becomes the controlling process specification. Corfin also processes a set-up part, which is verified by the processing engineer and Quality representative, to verify that the process is within specifications and maintains process and inspection data on all lots.

<<back

After parts are processed, how are the parts shipped back to the customer?

After the parts have been processed, Corfin packages the product in Matrix Trays, Tubes, Bulk, or Tape and Reel, as required per the Customer Requirements Form. Corfin can cross-reference your packaging requirements and provide a quotation for the appropriate package. If off-the-shelf shipping packages are not available, Corfin can provide custom Matrix Trays, Tubes, or Carrier Tape.

<<back

What kind of tooling does Corfin use to trim, form, and hot solder dip components?

Corfin can trim and form devices using any of the following:

  • Customer-consigned tooling
  • Corfin’s Universal Tooling
  • Universal Tooling is used for processing prototype or small lot sizes
  • Adjustable Tooling
  • Dedicated Dies
  • Adjustable Tooling and Dedicated Die Sets are used for on-going, high volume production or for those applications that require specific lead form geometries.

<<back

How do I get a quotation?

Call us at 1.603.893.9900. We’ll ask you to do the following:
Complete a Customer Requirements Form or have us complete one with you over the phone.
Fill out a Component Trim and Form Specification Sheet.
Forward these, along with sample parts, to Corfin.